Green-Left climate change bias easy as ABC

By James Delingpole, courtesy of “The Australian,” 23/5/2012.

MALE climate-change deniers are like terrorists, pedophiles and slave owners, claimed a contributor on BBC Radio 4’s religious affairs slot Thought for the Day last week. By the BBC’s lamentable standards, I’m afraid, this is what constitutes reasonable, fair and balanced commentary on the climate-change debate.

But as I’ve only now begun to appreciate after a month’s tour of Australia, the greenie-lefty bias of your own ABC is, if anything, even worse.

In Melbourne, I had a run-in with prickly ABC talk radio host Jon Faine, who kept insisting how “professional” he was being during the course of a brusque, hugely unsympathetic interview in which he interrupted my every answer and tried to tar me as a card-carrying agent of Satan in the pay of Big Oil. Why? Because I have had the temerity to suggest that there is no strong scientific evidence to support the theory of man-made global warming. (Which there isn’t).

My reception at Brisbane’s local ABC branch was only marginally less frosty. Before I went on, the host actually felt compelled to apologise to his audience for having a “contrarian” such as me on the show. He was doing so in the interests of “balance,” he cringingly explained. “Gee, thanks, mate!” I thought. “With an intro like that anyone would think I was a kiddie-fiddler or a Nazi, not a climate sceptic!”

Now it’s not that I’m afraid of tough interviews. Actually — as I hope I showed to my new best mate Fainey — I find them rather fun. Rather, my objection to the ABC, as it is to my own country’s BBC, is that it acts clearly and persistently in violation of its obligations as a publicly funded national broadcaster. It’s supposed to be fair and balanced — and it is. But only so long as your definition of “fair and balanced” is greener than Christine Milne and further left than Julia Gillard. Which, in my book, isn’t very.

Shortly before my interview with the ABC in Brisbane, I had the contrasting pleasure of a live encounter on 2GB with Australia’s most popular talk radio host Alan Jones. Well, obviously I was going to enjoy it more: Jones, like me, like most of his listeners, is a climate-change sceptic. Of course, I realise that for some Australians Jones is more toxic than a blue-ringed octopus. But here’s the difference between Jones and his ABC counterparts: if you don’t like him you don’t have to pay for him, not one cent.

Whereas with all the ABC’s vast battery of presenters, of course, you do — no matter how much you may dislike their almost uniformly green-left-progressive politics. (The single exception, as far as I’m aware, is Paul Comrie-Thomson’s consistently superb Counterpoint: the ABC’s equivalent of one of those Potemkin villages the Soviets used to build to impress visitors with just how free and lovely their country was.)

And you don’t only pay for the presenters (and their battalions of support staff), either. You also pay — out of the $1 billion-plus of your money spent by the government on the ABC each year — for their lavishly appointed work environments. The studios in which I met the ABC’s Steve Austin and 2GB’s Jones couldn’t have been more different. Austin’s was spacious and state-of-the-art in an office building you could have mistaken for that of a law firm or a bank; Jones was squeezed into a shoebox like the Black Hole of Calcutta at the back of an anonymous industrial estate.

Does this reflect their audience size and reach? Of course not: Jones’s show is many times more popular than Austin’s. Rather, what this illustrates is the massive difference between public and private-sector budgeting. As the ABC shows, if it’s coming out of the taxpayer’s pocket then money is no object. In the real commercial world, on the other hand, not even the mighty Jones gets the gold star treatment because profligacy is the enemy of profit.

But the fact the ABC offers relatively poor value for money to its shareholders — Australian taxpayers — should be the least of your worries. What’s of far more concern is the way that for years this fatly overindulged organisation, with its stranglehold on the Australian broadcast media, has been given carte blanche to skew the political debate in a relentlessly leftwards direction.

It’s the same in Britain with the ABC’s ugly elder sister, the BBC: on any given subject you know what the organisation’s position is going to be — anti-business, pro-regulation, credulous and uncritical on all green issues, slavish in its endorsement of politically correct pieties, always in favour of ever-expanding government.

Which is fine if you believe in that sort of thing but if you don’t you have a problem: here you are, forced to dig into your pocket every year to help people whose politics you violently disagree with campaign for all the things you hate. Not only that, but people who are actively seeking to close down alternative points of view.

In Britain we’ve seen this with the Leveson inquiry, in Australia you’ve had a (bitter) taste of it with the Finkelstein report, and in the US it’s evident in the ongoing attempts by the Left to hamstring (mostly conservative-leaning) talk shows with the Fairness Doctrine. Whatever their professed aims, each one of these represents a bullying attempt by the statist establishment — fully endorsed and often orchestrated by its friends in the left-leaning mainstream media — to gag any broadcast organisations that dare dissent from the prevailing politically correct orthodoxy.

One of the things that has always puzzled me about the Left is that for all its fine talk about the virtues of free speech, it’s often at least as eager as any authoritarian Right regime to close it down.

Nowhere is this tendency better exemplified than by the behaviour of those two gruesome siblings, the BBC and the ABC: despite their pretensions of even-handedness and social responsibility, the way they abuse their near-monopolistic domination of their country’s broadcast media owes more to statist tyrannies than free democracies.

James Delingpole is the author of Killing the Earth to Save It. www.jamesdelingpole.com

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